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Publishing

BEAwesome

Posted on May 30th, 2009 by annakjarzab

Whoosh! BEA totally washed over me like a hurricane today. Up is down, left is right, there’s a blister on my pinky toe and I feel like I just ran a marathon, but I’m so grateful to have gotten the chance to go.

The day looked something like this:

8:50 AM: Got to the Javits center, after having taken a cab because I was too much of a lazy to get out of my apartment at a decent time. I wandered around like a little lost fawn, desperately seeking the place where I was supposed to pick up my badge. Eventually I just walked up to a counter and was like, “I’m 99.9% sure I’m in the wrong place, but where’s the Media Room?” Apparently, I meant the Press Office. I found it and got my badge (that hot little piece you see in the picture below*) and met up with my coworkers for the 9:30 panel called Driving Success with Teens & Tweens: Authors Share Online Success Stories. But not before spying a woman dressed in nothing but a turquoise bikini. Where was I, the Adult Video News Awards?

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9:30 AM: Panel: Driving Success with Teens & Tweens. The authors featured on the panel were Sarah Mlynowski, Jessica Burkhart, Robyn Schneider, Julia DeVillers, and a very valiant Maureen Johnson, who I gather from her Twitter is totes sick (as in ill). She really rallied. They chatted for a while about the importance of having a website (frequently updated), blog (actually written in, and not just about your books), and building a community with Facebook, Ning, Twitter, and Polyvore, which I’d never heard of before but Julia DeVillers talked about and made to sound really cool. This panel (like all the panels I attended at BEA) served to prove to me that I’m doing the right things, and that there are a lot of smart people in this business. That was nice to hear.

10:30 AM: Flounced around with my boss for a while, meeting people and searching for a specific person who was not to be found. Oh well!

11:00 AM: I was going to go to another panel, but instead I met up with the awesome Josh Berk, fellow Tenner and surely decent Pennsylvania librarian. We decided to visit the Egmont booth, which I erroneously thought was in the back left corner of the floor–WRONG! Turns out, it was literally right behind where we had been, at the Random House, erm, “booth.” I dragged Josh and his poor librarian friends all over God’s green goodness, and nobody was too pleased with me, but whatever, we found it eventually. At least I can admit when I’m wrong. On the way, though, we saw Dr. Ruth, and Josh and I had our picture taken with her (she is tiny, and we look like GIANTS next to her). Amusingly, she wasn’t fazed by the request, probably because it happens all the time, but she wasn’t at all interested in why we wanted our picture taken with her or who we were or what we were doing just randomly accosting her like that. The picture’s on Josh’s camera, but I’ll link you to it when it goes up–I’m sure I look hideous.

The Egmont people are so lovely. Josh and I introduced ourselves, and I passed out some bookmarks, and we talked to the Egmont staff about Alex and Kay and Lindsay‘s books. Everybody was so excited about them, and Elizabeth Law (Egmont President extraordinaire) is incredibly friendly, demanding of me, “Why aren’t we friends on Facebook?” Must get on that, I’ve been neglecting Facebook for a while, sorry FB. I grabbed an ARC of Food, Girls, and Other Things I Can’t Have by Allen Zadoff, which looks great. Then Berk and I took off for a Debs brunch that we’d decided to crash (okay, Berk was invited; I was not, except if you think an invite from Berk counts, which I can assure you it does not).

Except! First, as we were walking through the Harlequin booth on the way to the doors, we ran smack dab into a veritable nest of authors. Sarah CrossDeb, Team Castle alum, and author of the newly released and certainly awesome (though I have not read it, I plan to tout suite) Dull Boy–was kind enough to put up with Berk and I, even though we were being such fools. I giddily shook hands with Ally Carter, NYT bestselling author of If I Tell You I Love You I’d Have to Kill You, Cross My Heart and Hope to Spy, and the soon to be released Don’t Judge a Girl By Her Cover (almost snagged a finished copy of it at the Hyperion booth, but alas I did not–cool story, huh?)–books I ADORE–and another Team Castle alum. I told Ally I love her books, and she was like, “I love your dress!”, which was sweet of her to say (also, it is a cute dress). I foisted a bookmark on Ally, Sarah, and Jennifer Lynn Barnes, the adorable author of Golden, Tattoo, and Fate (which I have at work and am trying to find time to read–so many books, so little time), ALSO a Team Castle alum (everybody was at that castle, apparently). Everyone was very nice and friendly, and it was sort of hilarious that, having not sought them out at all, I ran into so many authors I follow and admire.

12:30 PM: Berk and I crashed the Deb bruncheon. Everybody was really welcoming to us. I got to see Megan Crewe (Give Up the Ghost) again–talked to her for a bit at the kid lit drinks thing at Houndstooth last night–and Aprilynne Pike, whose debut Wings is on the NYT list for, I think, the third week now, which is awesome for her. I also got to meet Jon Skovron (Struts and Frets), Jenny Moss (Winnie’s War), Pam Bachorz (Candor, which you couldn’t even get ARCs of at the Egmont table, they went so quickly), Neesha Meminger (Shine, Coconut Moon), Shani Petroff (Daddy’s Little Angel) and Michelle Zink (Prophecy of the Sisters). Michelle and I sat next to each other, and she was so nice to me! We talked about California, where we both used to live, and New York and how crazy Californians look at you cross-eyed when you say you’re moving away from California, like why would you ever leave? Trust me, there are reasons. Even though Berk and I were sure we’d get booted from the table any minute, it was a great time, and everyone was really lovely.

2:00 PM: Back to BEA for another panel, this time Book Bloggers–Today’s Buzz Builders. I work with book bloggers every day for my day job, and I love them. I love what they do for books, I love how sincere they are about their passion for the written word, I love how nice they are, I love hearing what they think about the books I send them…it’s a great community, and I’m glad to be a part of it, if only tagentially. I feel a lot of affection for book bloggers. The panel confirmed for me things I pretty much already knew about how bloggers liked to be pitched and how they think publicists (I guess I pretty much fall into that category) can improve, and we’re definitely taking their suggestions to heart, while also feeling a bit puffed up about how well I think we do what we do.

3:00 PM-ish: Back to the floor. I loved Egmont so much I went back with my coworkers and we chatted with Rob, from the sales/marketing side, and Nico, managing editor. Great guys! Really friendly and easy to talk to. I love the start-up nature of Egmont and their real investment in the books that they’re publishing. I think they’ve got a terrific launch list, and their next seasons are going to be just as impressive, if what I heard is any indication. Nico chased me down after we left with an ARC of Todd Strasser’s Wish You Were Dead, which he thought would interest me. Thanks, friend! I also stopped by the Sourcebooks booth for a while–wish my friend Paul was there, so I could see and talk to him, but he was back in Chicago. Boo.

4:00 PM: Yet another panel, Stupid Things Booksellers and Publishers Do. I didn’t really know what to expect of this panel, honestly. I didn’t know that it would focus so heavily on the symbiotic but highly contentious at times relationship between publishers and booksellers. I think that’s because instead of “Stupid Things Booksellers and Publishers Do,” I’d read “Stupid Things Publishers Do,” because, you know, that’s the side of the industry all my experience lies in. But the title clearly says “Booksellers and Publishers,” so who’s the stupid one? I liked the panel, and I thought the discussion was interesting, but it sort of devolved into a “you do this crappy,” “well you do that crappy” sort of argument, and we noticed that the consumer–the most important part of the publishing industry, THE READER!–wasn’t mentioned often, if at all. Carla Cohen, from Politics and Prose in D.C., was sitting right behind me, and she had a lot of biting, insightful things to say, most of which I agreed with. It was an experience, especially since I know next to nothing about bookselling.

And that’s it! Now I’m home, resting, reading Julie & Julia and chilling out after my rather exhausting day. Oh, here’s a piece of goodwill towards men that shouldn’t go unmentioned: I told Berk that my friend, Mary, a frequent commenter in these here parts, hadn’t been able to get her hands on Catching Fire and was DYING to read it. I couldn’t lend her the copy I read, because it doesn’t belong to me and got snatched out of my hands the second I was done, but Berk very kindly gave me one of the copies he ended up with. Now MD has it in hand, so I hope to receive many emails that just say “djkl;afdjksla;fdjksla;fdjkls;asdf! This book is so good!” tonight. I owe ya one, Josh. And Mary, you owe me one. Your soul will do. Note: I DO NOT want your first born.

*Why yes, that is a Catching Fire mockingjay pin you see attached to my lanyard. That other pin you see? Well, that’s one of the darling little matryoshka buttons I bought on Etsy** (the woman who made them was SO sweet, she did a custom order for me and even sent me a little something extra, which was lovely of her) to include with prize giveaways and the like. Because those are coming! Once I get my ARCs. Which, judging from the way ARCs are suddenly flooding the Tenners being published in the same season as me, could be any day now.

**I know the Etsy page says they’re magnets–I bought magnets, too, but I asked her to make the same things into buttons as well, so there are both! What people will get in giveaways is up to me, WAH WAH.

Edited to Add: I forgot to mention that I met Jen Hayley and Shana Silver at the Kid Lit event at Houndstooth on Friday night, too. They were wonderful and sweet, tolerating me graciously. I would talk everybody’s head off about books and YA and writing if I could, everybody’s so cool to indulge me. Although I suspect many must feel the exact same way. :)

Back home again (and some fun news)

Posted on May 4th, 2009 by annakjarzab

Yesterday was sort of long. My flight was delayed and then I got in to JFK only to find that the taxi line was the longest I’d ever, ever seen it. It probably would’ve taken me an hour to get a cab, maybe more. I had already promised myself that if I took the subway to the airport on Friday I could take a cab home on Sunday, because of it being late and the weather and general laziness. But my desire to crawl into my bed last night vastly outweighed my total lack of desire to take the subway, and I hate standing around when I can be getting something accomplished, so I dragged my stuff to the Air Train and grabbed the A at Howard Beach.

Not that I didn’t already know this, but JFK is way the hell away from where I live. Like whoa. The A went local in Brooklyn, which is twenty-two stops (I counted). TWENTY-TWO. In Brooklyn alone. That doesn’t count the eight stops in Manhattan it took me to connect to the 1 train, which I rode another nine stops. Everybody on the train was so exhausted, you could see it in their faces, and every time we’d hit another stop in Brooklyn nobody recognized (because most of us were going to Manhattan or the first couple of stops in Brooklyn) you could see everybody’s shoulders sag.

I actually felt fine. I wasn’t hungry even though I hadn’t eaten much all day and I was relatively awake, considering how early I’d gotten up, the rapid time changes and the fact that I’d slept fitfully on the plane (my hands kept falling asleep, and I kept jerking awake, which is a really annoying habit of mine when I’m sleeping sitting up). Thank heaven for small mercies. When I got home, I was reminded of why people usually leave their apartments cleaner than normal when they go on a trip–because who wants to come back to a big mess? Well, I came back to a big mess. But I just couldn’t deal with it, so I threw everything on the floor/my desk and figured I’d deal with it later. Very Scarlett O’Hara of me.

Oh, by the way, that good news I wanted to share but couldn’t? Joanna gave me the go-ahead to announce that we sold the audio rights for All Unquiet Things to Listening Library, Random House’s audio arm! I’m really excited about this because they’re so enthusiastic about the book at LL that they preempted it, and having the audio book being put out by the same publisher as the physical book means that they can do a lot of marketing in tandem, which is fortuitous. I don’t do a lot of audio book listening myself, mostly because I need to read things in order to retain them, something about how my brain processes information. But I know a lot of people who love audio books, especially in New York where it can be a bit of a pain to read a physical book on a crowded subway train, so having the book released in that format is pretty rad.

Also, you can find AUT on two more sites now: Indie Bound and Borders. Borders even has a description up: “After the death of his ex-girlfriend Carly, northern California high school student Neily joins forces with Carly’s cousin Audrey to try to solve her murder.” Short, easy to remember. It’s better than my elevator pitch, which is, “Um…it’s a YA murder mystery?…About these two teenagers…whose friend dies…and they solve her murder?” I’m awful at this. Must improve. I can tell you that MB is about the snobby son of two academics who has to put aside his pretentions and his prejudices to solve the mystery of why his best friend suddenly went missing. That’s better, isn’t it?

Cue head exploding

Posted on April 1st, 2009 by annakjarzab

Have you ever had so much go on within a short span of time that you feel like your head is just going to pop like a party balloon? That’s how I feel right now. Don’t worry, I’m self-medicating with some Chinese food. I’m on top of this.

Yesterday and this morning involved a lot of back and forth over jacket flap copy for AUT, which is exciting but also nerve-wracking. Has anyone else noticed that it’s really hard to describe your own book? As the person who spent six years writing it, I feel like everything is important, and I don’t know how to boil it down to the essentials without frying all my circuits. Thank God for agents and editors, right? I’m so tired.

That might have a little to do with being out so late last night, though. One of the reasons I’m super lucky to be living in New York is that I have so many good friends here, and they’re all cool and interesting and into a hundred different things. I’ve managed over the course of a few months to pick up several guy friends who are amateur stand-up comedians, but until last night I’d never seen any of them up on stage. Me, Cambria and Nikki headed over to Gotham after work (short pit stop at Dallas BBQ for margaritas and chicken fingers, OBVS, as it’s right there) and were able to see our friends David and Brian (both incredibly funny) perform. There were a lot of funny people, and it was nice to see some lady comics, because when Bri and I went to Gutbucket a few weeks ago there was only one and she was…fine.

Speaking of Gutbucket, one of my favorite comics from that show performed at Gotham last night. His name is Luke Cunningham and I think he’s hilarious, that’s all.

Afterwards we went to Trailer Park, which is just down the street. It’s a kitschy little bar made up to resemble (what else?) a trailer park. I personally think it’s a little too expensive to live up to its name ($5 PBR? That’s highway robbery, that is) but the atmosphere is pretty great and the tater tots are to die for. We hung around with David, Brian, and a bunch of other comedians after the show, including one of the ladies, who I’m pretty sure I gave some material to, although quite honestly it’s nothing that hasn’t been done before on Sex and the City, so whatevs. MD also joined us after her date, bringing the party as always.

I got home around midnight, but then of course stayed up until one to finish Wintergirls, which is so wonderful and traumatizing. Some people don’t like sad, emotionally eviscerating books, but those are my favorite kinds, and Wintergirls is the perfect example. In short, I loved it, Laurie Halse Anderson is a rock star.

Cool stuff I can’t do but you totally should

Posted on February 18th, 2009 by annakjarzab

Luckily for anyone in the NYC metro area, just announced today on Scott Westerfeld’s blog, there’s going to be a NYC Teen Author Festival March 16-22, 2009. Doesn’t that sound fun?

What? No, I’m not bitter I can’t go. Even though so many of the authors appearing on the panels are people whose blogs I read religiously and whose books I really like. It’s fine. I have a job, and I’m grateful for that. I’m not at all upset that I’m missing Scott, Justine Larbalestier, David Levithan, Diana Peterfreund and others discuss their juvenalia*, even though I admire their bravery because you’d have to threaten me with extreme bodily harm before I’d agree to do that and EVEN THEN I wouldn’t be able to because I have absolutely no idea where any of my juvenalia is, or if it is even still extant. I mean, that doesn’t even sound cool at all. Lots of YA authors reading from works in progress or playing in a rock band or signing books or celebrating teen readers? SNORE.

Whatever. You should go, though. LUCKY.

*There are three different ways I can think of to spell that word (“juvenelia”, “juvenilia”, and “juvenalia”) and they all look totally wrong. I’m going to trust that Scott Westerfeld got it right. I’m not even going to look it up, that’s how much I trust him. It’s like that game where you fall backwards into someone’s arms except with words, which makes it even scarier.

AuthorsNow

Posted on January 7th, 2009 by Anna Jarzab

My profile is up at AuthorsNow, you guys, so you can go over there and comment about how cool you think I am, because you do that here so much already!

Jay kay I love you. While you’re over there commenting on my awesomeness, you should also surf the site and see all the other debuting YA authors upon whose awesomeness you can also comment.

OOC

Posted on March 31st, 2008 by Anna Jarzab

ETA: In my personal news, I finished my AUT revisions! I think I’ll let it sit a week or so then go back to excise extraneous adverbs, but otherwise Round 1 is complete.

I didn’t catch this until way after it was posted by both Gawker and Galley Cat, but apparently there is an editor out there who recently found herself on the receiving end of an unexpected visit from an aspiring author. I have no idea how he got my name–I’d never met him before, she writes. But he came in asking for me by name and carrying his unsolicited manuscript (which, incidentally, is a kind of book I have never acquired and my company has never published).

The Gawker-generated traffic sort of overwhelmed her blog, but in addition she got lots of hate mail from people who were angered (?) or offended (??) by her post. I do not understand this at all. Apparently, Sheila, the Gawker reporter whose original post started the whole shenanigans, also was deluged with hate mail because she was forced to add this little disclaimer to the post: Note: these very sensible suggestions are from the Editorial Ass blog, not by me. So stop sending me angry emails about the ways in which you disagree!

I’m…so confused. I’ve read all of the suggestions and I find them quite reasonable. I don’t understand who could possibly have taken offense to them. This is all very obvious–don’t ever show up at a publisher’s office if you have not been expressly invited, don’t expect your unsolicited manuscript to receive anywhere near the same amount of attention or consideration as an agented MS (unless this is a publisher that still takes unagented manuscripts, in which case I don’t know but still don’t show up in person!), don’t call and harass the editor and his/her assistant, don’t be pushy and entitled. DUH. How is this not Gospel to every single person? Some of that might require research to figure out, but some of it is just plain old common sense. I have no earthly idea why anyone would object to the things that Moonrat said in her post. Also, the Gawker commenters really got stupid on that post–not wanting to be contacted by potentially crazy people that you don’t know/know if you can trust is a NORMAL feeling experienced by EVERYONE. It has nothing to do with people/phone skills.

Somebody named MisterHippity commented on the Gawker post, A couple of things here kind of pissed me off. For example: “Know what I acquire. If you send me your manuscript and it has nothing to do with what I edit, why should I do you the courtesy of wasting my very precious free time responding to you?” Ok, it takes exactly 10 seconds to send that person an e-mail saying “I’m sorry, but the subject of your manuscript doesn’t relate the kind of material I normally publish. So I’m afraid I can’t consider it. Best regards …” Instead, you’re going to leave that person hanging for weeks on end with no word because you’re so outraged that they “haven’t done the footwork”?

UH, YEAH. Has this person ever SEEN a slush pile before? They’re GINORMOUS! I do think that there are problems on both sides of the equation here, but authors who send blanket submissions without regard for agent and editor preferences, without doing any modicum of research, without knowing the rules of the game, are a plague on everyone, including themselves. I’m not using the word “game” here to imply that there is a malicious, manipulative agenda behind it all, but there are rules. There are. There have to be. Because any fool with a typewriter can “write a novel” and send it out. Agents and editors want badly to find manuscripts to sell and buy–that’s how they make their livings, but more importantly it actually matters to them, in a way that most people’s jobs don’t. There is no conspiracy in place to keep you, Unsolicited Author, from putting your brilliant thoughts and imaginings out there. The rules aren’t secret–they’re freely available to anybody with a library card (Writer’s Market) or the Internet (Miss Snark, Agent Query, FOR A START). You want to get published, write a great novel, then learn how to get an agent and get one. It’s a lot more work than that, full of rejection and failure and disappointment, but in the end, if you’re patient, hard-working, persistent (but not obnoxious), optimistic, and informed, you will get there.

And I’m sorry, but this kind of shit, this author coming into the building unannounced and trying to get a face-to-face meeting with the editor? It’s scary. I know because it happened to me. I used to work at a literary agency and we kept the door locked for expressly this reason–so that we could decide who came in and who stayed out. One day, a seemingly innocuous man came to the door and I opened it and politely asked him what I could do for him and he went on a forty minute ramble, asking me if I was familiar with the greatest baseball poem ever written (I wasn’t; apparently, that’s “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Thayer). Then he proceeded to tell me that he had written the new “Casey at the Bat” and he wanted us to publish it. Now, I tried to explain that we were not a publishing company, we were an agency, but he wouldn’t listen, nor do I think he particularly cared. I tried to tell him how he could query us via email, but he was adamant that he didn’t want to go through all that hassle (seriously: “I don’t want to bother with that”), that he had something really special here. This whole time he kept trying to push his way into the office, which was very unnerving. Both my bosses were out of town at a conference at the time, so thankfully I could tell him truthfully that he could not, in fact, come in and talk to either of them.

Then he took out a bag of CDs on which he had recorded himself reciting his new baseball poem (I don’t know, something about a girl named Katie playing on a Little League team in the fifties…I wasn’t quite sure) and handed me one…then two…then a third, so that I could give one to my boss, keep one for myself to listen to, and ANOTHER for me to keep wrapped in plastic because in 20 years it would “put my kids through college” I kid you not. Then he proceeded to recite the poem for me from memory. This whole time I’m standing gatekeeper at the door, not letting him in, trying to impress upon him my need to go back to my work and also his need to query us formally via email or regular mail, but he wouldn’t listen. Eventually he went away because I took the CDs and promised that he’d hear from us in the next two weeks. It was such a relief when I closed the door, and I’m sure he was just a harmless man and just really enthusiastic, and we did listen to the CD (which was, of course, much more than we owed him since he a.) hadn’t queried us, b.) sort of harassed me, and c.) we don’t do poetry), but we eventually rejected it, which he wasn’t expecting and he did email me back angrily, but I didn’t respond.

My point is that you rarely get dismissed out of hand by a good, responsible agent (those are the only ones whose attentions you want, anyway) if you follow the rules. The rules being that you conform to all of their submissions requirements (most of them have detailed submissions guidelines on websites, and the ones that don’t are in Writer’s Market or on Agent Query), you only query them in genres that they have expressed interest in or sold before (Publishers Marketplace is an excellent source of this information; submission req’d for deals listings, though), you only query them the way they liked to be queried (some have forms on their websites, some only want email, some only want regular mail, some will take a combination of both, and some don’t want to be queried by unpublished authors, which is their right because it’s their business and obvs. they’re not the right agents for you, then), and you cut them some slack on getting back to you because agents get submissions numbering in the hundreds and thousands per week and, really, assistants and interns only have so much time.

The other thing is, most editors don’t want to see unagented stuff. Again, this is a time issue, and also because agents can usually be counted on to do exactly what uninformed writers refuse to do, which is tailor submissions based on known editor preferences and the needs of his/her list. It’s a streamlining thing, NOT an exclusionary thing. And, yes, it’s a higher quality assurance thing. Sorry. Not everybody gets to be a highly paid Hollywood actor, not everybody gets to be a Grammy-nominated musician, and not everybody gets to be a published writer. Lots more people get to be published than act or sing professionally, but still. There’s a carrying capacity. But showing up at publishing houses is not the way to get published; it’s the way to NOT get published. You aren’t doing yourself any favors by not doing the research and just bombarding random agents and editors with submissions. Moonrat’s suggestions are perfectly reasonable, and the very smart writers will either already know these things, or learn things things from her or other sources, and put them to use in their journey toward getting published. The not-smart writers who ignore them…well, let’s just say I’ve never seen a brilliant piece of work in an otherwise messy, completely rules-ignoring submission. Not everybody who follows the rules is talented and/or has a great novel to sell, but it’s my personal opinion that the ones who DO sell, 99.9% of the time they probably followed the rules to the T.